The Page a Day Writers Group

twtrifles:

Sharon won’t brag on our writers’ blog, but I’m happy to let you know about her extreme awesomeness! Already a successful self-published author, Kimani Romance, a subsidiary of Harlequin, asked Sharon to write a few books for them. I believe this one is her second traditionally published novel, and she is still self-publishing other titles. Hybrid authors are becoming more common. Check out Sharon’s website https://sharoncooper.wordpress.com to see all the titles she has published in the last few years. This girl is cookin’.

Originally posted on Sharon C. Cooper:

Woo hoo! Look what’s available in paperback – SIN CITY TEMPTATION!

Sin City Temptation Cover - FinalIs love in the cards? 

Former police officer Trinity Layton will do anything to keep her personal security business afloat—even babysit professional poker player Gunner Brooks. Bizarre incidents have been plaguing the poker tour, and Trinity has been hired to keep Gunner safe. But when the gorgeous playboy convinces her to pose as his girlfriend, she might be the one who needs protecting, as their passionate charade quickly becomes all too real.

A gambler in the game of life, Gunner has made his fortune playing for the greatest prizes. The last thing he needs during this tournament is a bodyguard hanging around, especially one as alluring as Trinity. And being together 24/7 just tripled their odds of falling for one another. Now, as Gunner prepares for the championship of his career, he’s playing for the highest stakes of…

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Originally posted on Writing and Illustrating:

Three Tricks For Showing Rather Than Telling

 by Trish Wilkinson

trish20131226_D800_trishwilkinson_family_5447_trish_2x3-225x300For readers to become invested in a story, they need to “see” characters’ movement and action within a setting. Writers often hear, “Show don’t tell,” and sometimes we think, “But I did show – didn’t I? How do I fix this?”

Here are a few quick tips for showing rather than telling:

  1. Use ACTIVE VERBS rather than passive ones wherever possible.

Keep this list of passive verbs near your computer until you get in the habit of using them sparingly. (I tell my students: “If you must use passive verbs, limit them to no more than one or two on a page.”)

  • Forms of be to AVOID: is, are, was, were, be, being, and been
  • Auxiliary verbs: am, did, do, does, can, may, might, will, would, shall, should, must, has, have, had, could
  • Adjectives (describing words)
  • Adverbs (words used to…

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Everyday I wake up thinking how I can best slice my 24-hour pie. A myriad of tasks stream through my mind including how to deepen my main character, amp up the tension of a scene, why there so many calories in lemon olive oil. I jump out of bed convinced that all the “to-dos” in my head will magically become “to-dones” by the end of the day. A fantasy rarely achieved.

But as John Lennon sang: Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans.

The car won’t start. The dog is hacking. An article deadline looms and a key resource hasn’t returned my email. Spin life’s wheel and each day you can substitute “life happenings” pre-empting coveted writing time. Surprisingly, I’m not alone in my struggle.

I read Katrina Kittle’s post Keep the Faucet On: Slow and Steady Fills the Ocean. After commiserating with every writer’s plight, Kittle offers simple, real-world suggestions to those scheduling conflicts/time management issues.

I’m starting by letting go of my belief that a writing schedule must look the same every day. What a relief. Her words of encouragement got me back to the keyboard.

Maybe, with a little pre-planning and realistic expectation, time really is on your side.

–Claire Yezbak Fadden

Hi readers!

If you liked my short fiction piece “Black Sun,” about the aftermath of a volcanic super eruption, please take a few seconds to vote for it to win Story of the Month.

Click the link to head to Drunk Monkeys. :) Thanks pals!

Kirsten

 

I had a great time reading a few poems and chatting with the lovely folks over at Pretty Owl Poetry about art, words, process and creativity last night. My poem “thirst” appeared in their third issue along with a photograph that I took in Romania (cover). Thanks to Kelly, Rose and Gordon!

 

twtrifles:

Here’s a great post from Kathy Teamen, authot of blog: Writing and Illustrating that does a great job of clarifying point of view. Several of my coaching clients struggle with POV, and this short article does a great job of summarizing how it works.

Originally posted on Writing and Illustrating:

rivet your readersI added Jill Elizabeth Nelson, Rivet Your Readers with Deep Point of View to my writing library and want to recommend that you check it out. The information is good and the price is right – $3.99 on Kindle and $5.39 in paperback. You can take a look at Jill’s romantic suspense novels by clicking this link to her website. http://www.jillelizabethnelson.com/

Below are just a few things that Jill explains in her book. She gets more in depth during the book.

In fiction writing, the position from which anything is considered in any given scene should be the character through whose head we are viewing events. That character’s psyche – his or her very soul – is the standpoint from which everything else in the scene is presented and evaluated. This particular character is the point-of-view character or POVC.

In order to remain firmly inside the POVC’s head, nothing in a scene can be presented for…

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twtrifles:

Sharon C Cooper, one of our Page a Day authors, is at it again. Go Sharon!

Originally posted on Sharon C. Cooper:

Hi all, I have some exciting news! But first – what a fun weekend! I attended the second annual B.R.A.B (Building Relationships Around Books) Readers Retreat and had a blast! B.R.A.B is an online (Facebook) book club with over a thousand readers (and authors) and it’s the place where I have found some great books by new (new to me) authors.

Though I attended the retreat (held in Georgia) as a reader – so that I could support some of my author friends and meet some of my favorite authors – I had the pleasure of meeting some of MY fans! How cool is that!? I thought the event was very well thought out and though it was for the readers, I think authors really enjoyed themselves as well. I know I did!

Okay, so now for my exciting news – I, Sharon C. Cooper, was one of six authors nominated…

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Who are we?

The Page a Day Writers Group is a diverse collection of wonderful writers based in San Diego, CA. We've been meeting monthly since 2004. Our primary function is in-depth writing critique, marketing and brainstorming, but there's usually some wine, chocolate and ribaldry involved too. We write fantasy, humor, literary fiction, nonfiction, romance, thrillers and YA. Join us on our journeys to publication and the wonderland beyond!

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